Interpretive Signs, Solitary Islands Coastal Walk

The provision of high quality information and interpretive signs was a major focus of this project. Seven large panels display a map of the complete walk and are installed at major trackheads along headlands and beaches. An additional 17 ‘minor directional’ signs provide further wayfinding assistance and interpretive information.

Interpretive signs, Look At Me Now headland

These large panels (1955mm wide x 1185mm high) were themed on the Walk, Aboriginal Heritage, lighthouse and history of Look At Me Now headland, including the flora and fauna. The signs feature Aboriginal place names, original art created by local Aboriginal artists, cultural information relevant to the walk, a welcome in Gumbaynggirr language, and the replacement of some culturally inappropriate material on older signage. This interpretive signage also featured:

  • historical images/photos and quotes provided by the Coffs Harbour local museum, State Library and local historical societies
  • interpretation of the maritime history relating to the South Solitary Lighthouse, ship wrecks and local jetties
  • environmental information relating to marine life, endangered ecological communities and other plants and animals found along the route
  • information including the community fight to protect what is now Moonee Beach Nature Reserve.

Damerells Headland

Various sizes, construction and designs were implemented along The Walk. Damerells Headland was the site that the signal station was moved to when the lighthouse was decommissioned. Two sets of double sided signs (300mm wide x 800mm high) were created to tell the stories of the lighthouse keepers. They were designed as if looking out the lighthouse window.

Headland and Beach wayfinding signs

The provision of high quality interpretive signs and information was a major focus and includes:

  • 7 large panels with a map of the whole route installed at major trackheads
  • 17 ‘minor directional’ signs with interpretive panels

The Walk

The self-guided Solitary Islands Coastal Walk (‘SICW’ or ‘the Walk’) tourism development was completed and launched in November 2012.

It provides a new, high quality tourism product for the Coffs Coast combining a 60-kilometre walking route with quality interpretation and a range of services and facilities.

The Walk is in a high impact, harsh coastal environment. Materials used in The Walk interpretive signage and infrastructure are long-lasting and have relatively low maintenance requirements and costs. They include: tamper proof fittings, UV resistant coatings, recycled plastic (resistant to termites, rot, splits and never needs painting), two-pak finishes and 6mm thick aluminium back plates.

The walking route offers spectacular coastal views and passes through a diversity of coastal landscapes along the Coffs Coast, adjacent to the Solitary Islands Marine Park. The Walk links Sawtell in the south to Red Rock in the north, traversing beaches, headlands, rocky shores, coastal creeks and villages, endangered grasslands and rare littoral rainforest.

Tourism Award - Solitary Islands Coastal WalkThe Solitary Islands Coastal Walk won the Gold Award for New Tourism Development in the 2013 Country Link North Coast Tourism Awards. It was also a finalist – NSW Tourism Awards.

Red Rock

The Red Rock interpretive display panels are 2270 mm wide x 1060 mm high. ‘Shorebird Country’ was developed in February 2015 to complement the existing signage for the latest Solitary Islands Coastal Walk. It was designed to match the existing suite of signs which are installed in another shelter nearby. This environmentally based sign uses a combination of line drawings, photography and artwork.

 

Interpretive Themes

  • Panels with historical images/photos and quotes provided by the Coffs Harbour local museum, State Library and local historical societies
  • Interpretation of the maritime history relating to the South Solitary Lighthouse, ship wrecks and local jetties
  • Environmental information relating to marine life, endangered ecological communities and other plants and animals found along the route
  • Information including the community fight to protect Moonee Beach Nature Reserve.

Testimonial

Dee Rogers from The Interpretive Design Company has been producing high quality interpretive products for me at the Coffs Coast Area of National Parks for over 10 years. The latest and largest project Dee has worked with me on has been the Solitary Islands Coastal Walk which  consisted of the design and production of over 200 signs. These were a combination of directional signs, major track head signs and beautiful interpretive signs. Dee also produced a Z-Card for the walk as well as web based products. All the work was done to the highest quality. Dee is an absolute delight to work with and so I recommend her to anyone requiring quality design work. Ann Walton, Ranger – Coffs Coast Area, National Parks and Wildlife Service

  • Date: July 2012 – November 2012
  • Service: Interpretive design, wayfinding, mapping, logo development, consultation
  • Specs: over 50 signs total
    – 14 interpretive panels for shelters at Look at Me Now Headland and Red Rock
    – 7 x large panels with a map of the whole route installed at major trackheads
    – 17 minor directional signs with interpretive panels located in visitor nodes, key access points and in areas of more complex navigation
    – 113 route markers or ‘reassurance totems’ located at key decision points along the walk
    – 11 trackside signs that provide interpretation only
    – Z-Card pocket sized folding brochure and map
    – Memorial signs for shipwreck and lighthouse keeper

 

Aboriginal Exhibition Artwork, Spirit of the Land
Indigenous Signage, Solitary Islands Coastal Walk