Environmental Interpretive Signs, Parramatta Council

In June 2018, the City of Parramatta Council embarked on a project to create environmental interpretive signs for a walking trail. Through site visits and extensive research, we developed engaging themes and content, while considering the council’s newly developed templates. The outcome? A visually stunning collection of 10 interpretive signs, promptly installed and measuring 800mm wide x 600mm high.

Environmental interpretive signs

During the Council amalgamation in 2017/8, the City of Parramatta Council acquired Hunts Creek and Seville Reserves. These two small reserves, situated in Sydney’s North Rocks district, boast notable landscape features like Balaka Falls and sandstone caves, as well as rare ecological communities and endangered flora and fauna. Their cultural significance stems from the Aboriginal occupation by the Darug clans and European land use. With new environmental interpretive signs, the project sought to communicate the value of these reserves to residents and visitors alike.

The project aimed to foster appreciation for small fragments of bushland in urban areas by raising awareness through environmental interpretive signs. With a text count of about 250 words written at a 12-year-old reading level, the signs followed the rules of non-personal media. Their emphasis lies on visually appealing images, inviting visitors to engage and explore.

During installation, preserving the environment proved challenging as it involved the sensitive habitat of the Dural Land Snail – an endangered species with a slow pace. The nocturnal snail seeks refuge under rocks, tree bark, and leaf litter during the day, underscoring the importance of minimizing human impact.

Testimonial

I was out on the site earlier today and managed to take a look at one of the installed signs and was ecstatic with the result… thank you for doing such a marvellous job!

Nicola Trulock, Natural Resource Officer, City of Parramatta

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