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Interpretive murals, Gumgali Track, Korora Lookout

These Interpretive murals tell the Gumbaynggirr story of Gumgali, the black goanna, who burrowed through the escarpment beneath Korora Lookout to emerge in the sea off Macauleys Headland.  By sharing a local story that has been passed down through generations of people using these forests, the Gumgali Track gives visitors to Coffs Harbour a small insight into the garlugun.gi.girrwaa or first mob of this area.

Interpretive murals

Over 30-metres of Interpretive murals allow visitors to experience the story of Gumgali on their way to the lookout.

The mural artists

Artists Snarly and Yowa have been collaborating on walls and cross pollinating graffiti culture with Gumbaynggirr culture, a mix of the old and the new, for a few years now. YOWA discovered the medium of spray paint as a quick and fluid way to create her contemporary organic pattern work and alien beings at a large scale. As a young Gumbaynggirr woman, being able to share her unique style of painting through street art and graffiti culture has brought her into the public eye. Yowa has been able to share her story and culture with a much broader audience as a featured artist painting ‘live’ in front of crowds at a number of events and festivals.

SNARL grew up in Sydney surrounded by graffiti and quickly connected with a culture that was all about young people doing it for themselves. After 20+ years of style writing and commissioned works, part of the fun for Snarly is sharing practical skills and helping to create opportunities for emerging artists that are pushing their own original style. Sharing Gumbaynggirr culture is as important to Snarly as his family – they are one and the same.

Interpretive sculptures

View the Gumgaliinterpretive sculptures by John van der Kolk.

Interpretive signage and audio

View the additional interpretive media on the Gumgali Track.

Categories:   Interpretive Projects, Aboriginal