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About

The Interpretive Design Company

Hello, our names are Dee Rogers and Peter O’Brien. We are the owners of THE INTERPRETIVE DESIGN COMPANY  a design studio specialising in projects for environmental and cultural heritage sites. We specialise in it because we love it.

Our interpretive projects involve creating visitor experiences with signage, maps, wayfinding material, sculpture, sound posts and digital media. We research stories, develop themes and key messages, write content, design installations and signage, create interpretive/concept plans and project manage production. Completed projects have contributed to the receipt of several Australian tourism awards.

Our aim is to communicate information about a site (or resource) to visitors…to give them an explanation of the nature, origin and purpose of the area they are visiting through beautiful signage, great content, and sensitive installations.

We acknowledge the Traditional Owners of the land we work on, the Gumbaynggirr people, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present.

Dee Rogers

Dee is the driving force and creative talent that has established the Interpretive Design Company as a premier creative studio. In a life of curious twists and turns – Art, Music, Computers and Art again – Dee returned to the world of design for her daytime career in 2002. About Dee

Peter O’Brien

The Interpretive Design Company has given Peter the opportunity to pursue his life-long passion for writing. His application to researching themes and stories, and attention to detail are creatively blended into engaging text. About Peter

Clients

Our clients include state, federal and local government departments. We have been contracted by NGO’s, indigenous groups and private enterprise. We work at home (Australia) and abroad.

Testimonials

There are so many clients we love working with and who love working with us! Testimonials

The Teardrop

The Teardrop was purchased with the view to stay on location during the research phase of interpretive planning and we have enjoyed many such site visits. All the mod cons are onboard: a queen size bed; small kitchenette: toolbox up front; and, of course, TV, CD player and the very important fridge. The Teardrop